Translate This
Boycott Workfare is a UK-wide campaign to end forced unpaid work for people who receive welfare. Workfare profits the rich by providing free labour, whilst threatening the poor by taking away welfare rights if people refuse to work without a living wage. We are a grassroots campaign, formed in 2010 by people with experience of workfare and those concerned about its impact. We expose and take action against companies and organisations profiting from workfare; encourage organisations to pledge to boycott it; and actively inform people of their rights.

Another win: 4-year legal battle finally reveals workfare exploiters!

Posted: July 31st, 2016 | Author: | Filed under: Charities, Law, Name and shame | 7 Comments »

This is the first of two linked posts about the DWP being forced to reveal the names of hundreds of workfare exploiters from 2012, after losing a four year legal battle. Frank Zola has pursued this information since 2012. Mr Zola is a member of Boycott Workfare, and you can read the second post – his detailed account of the Court of Appeal ruling and its background – here: 500+ abusers of workfare conscripts named and shamed. He was previously sanctioned as a flexible new deal (“work for your benefit“) workfare refusenik and A4e conscript.

Another win: 4-year legal battle finally reveals workfare exploiters! 1In January 2012, three Freedom of Information requests were made for the names of organisations that were benefitting from unpaid labour through workfare schemes. This month the Department for Work and Pensions finally released information about one of these schemes – Mandatory Work Activity – after they’d resisted and delayed, appealing from court to court, for four and a half years. The public now officially have a right to know which organisations use workfare. You can read the full list of 534 businesses and charities who were involved in MWA here.

Workfare secrecy

Workfare – forced, unpaid labour in return for social security – relies on businesses and charities being willing to take on benefit claimants as unpaid workers. Up until this week, the DWP has protected the identity of these organisations.

The information the DWP has just released is about the business and charities that were using MWA placements in 2011-12. But the ruling means that the DWP should now disclose further information about which organisations are benefitting from workfare today, in response to further requests. Any of us can use a Freedom of Information request to find out what organisations are using workfare in our area, or across the UK.

Summed up, the story is as follows: the DWP refused to release the information in 2012. After the DWP’s internal review decided they were right to refuse, Frank Zola appealed to the Information Commissioner’s Office, who told the DWP to release the information. The DWP refused and appealed to the First Tier Tribunal, then to the Upper Tribunal, then to the Court of Appeal.  At each stage they were told to release the information, but decided to appeal again. Now finally they have complied with the law. You can track the whole process here. Unsurprisingly, however, the DWP have refused to say how much money they have wasted on court appeals, whilst perversely continuing to sanction people in record numbers.

Workfare never works

These failing workfare schemes are run by private contractors to the DWP and have cost the public billions, yet with nothing to show for it.  The flagship scheme, the Community Work Programme (CWP), was quietly axed in the 2015 Autumn Statement, after only two years of running. How could CWP succeed when the DWP’s own 2008 research into workfare concluded ‘there is little evidence that workfare increases the likelihood of finding work’ and the evaluation of the CWP pilot scheme found it to be totally ineffective?

Most importantly, how could CWP succeed while charities are pulling out of using workfare in record numbers?  Oxfam and many others have pulled out since 2012 – due to your actions and your support.  More recently over 600 voluntary organisations have signed the Keep Volunteering Voluntary pledge, and continue to do so. When charities are informed that workfare means sanctions, they pull out.

Holding workfare exploiters to account

This is the real reason the DWP doesn’t want these names in the public domain: if people knew what was really going on in their local charity shop, council office or retail store, these organisations would be held to account: the schemes would collapse, just like CWP. Luckily, regardless of the DWP’s legal bid, thanks to claimants, and people like you, Boycott Workfare uses ‘name and shame’ tactics to expose workfare profiteers. We shut them down with your help. You can still name and shame workfare exploiters here, and it’s important you still do so. Why? Because workfare affects everyone.Another win: 4-year legal battle finally reveals workfare exploiters!

With the introduction of Universal Credit (UC), it will not be just unemployed people who are subject to workfare and sanctions. UC claimants – including people in work but who are not earning enough according to the DWP – will be required to undertake workfare or will be sanctioned for refusing.

Workfare is also being forced on disabled people and people with long term health conditions claiming Employment and Support Allowance who are in the Work Related Activity Group – again to the vast profit of private companies. Workfare affects everyone. Not only does it exploit claimants and vulnerable people: the supply of unpaid labour helps to force down wages, worsen working conditions, and means that staff are laid off.

The ‘collapse of the scheme’

The DWP argued in court that if they released all the information it would lead to the ‘the collapse of the MWA scheme’ and the demise of the whole workfare system. They were worried public opinion would be against workfare exploitation and that those using workfare would be pressurised to pull out. Well they did pull out, they are pulling out, and they will pull out. Let’s make sure the DWP’s worst fears now materialise and public pressure ensures that workfare is consigned to history.

Workfare isn’t over just yet, but this legal judgement along with your active continued support quickens its demise. There is no hiding behind anonymity any more for workfare profiteers, nor any excuse for them to be involved in workfare schemes. It’s a fact, as this campaign shows, that workfare cannot exist without anywhere to send people to. So, together let us continue to shut down workfare. After all, we’re the ones providing the real public service!


7 Comments on “Another win: 4-year legal battle finally reveals workfare exploiters!”

  1. 1 Boycott Workfare » Blog Archive » 500+ abusers of workfare conscripts named and shamed – as in the public interest said at 12:45 pm on July 31st, 2016:

    […] Mandatory Work Activity in 2011-12. The first post – a response from Boycott Workfare – is here. This blog is a guest post by Frank Zola, a member of Boycott Workfare who has been involved […]

  2. 2 Scottish organisations named on 'workfare' providers list said at 8:53 pm on July 31st, 2016:

    […] Campaign group Boycott Workfare have summed up the process on their blog. […]

  3. 3 jon parker said at 11:44 pm on July 31st, 2016:

    ‘2008 research into workfare’ – interesting to see that even in US, whose workfare model has largely been seen as precursor to the UK model, there are significant differences between system used over there & the UK system. In particular it’s interesting to see that ‘workfare’ – the use of unpaid forced labour backed up by sanctions – which is the foundation for the UK model accounts for only a small element of the US model with other, much more successful elements like subsidised (paid) jobs being used to much greater effect. Why hasn’t this model been applied in the UK? It seems like, while supposedly applying the US model because of its alleged positive impact on employment rates (which the report freely admits has not happened), we have instead simply applied a small element of the US model which in the US is reserved for just a small proportion of eligible claimants. And this element has been actively refused in some US states. So here is conclusive proof, if any further proof were needed, that not only is workfare in general ineffective in getting the unemployed into jobs (the overarching conclusion of all the studies conducted in the US, Canada and Australia) but that it seems to have only 1 recognised impact – punishing the unemployed for being unemployed. It has to be noted from this research that the observation was frequently made that the impact on getting claimants into jobs was minimal and in some cases this feature of the programmes was deliberately avoided in the rationale stated for these programmes.

  4. 4 Rosemarie Harris said at 3:42 pm on August 1st, 2016:

    Thanks to Frank Zola for trying and actually getting the information in the end.. These aren’t the only ones that were using the unemployed I was sent to Army of Angles and someone else I know was going to be sent to The riding for the disabled in Cheltenham.
    I would like to know how many people actually got a job and is still working at any of these ‘free jobs’
    I for one will never support any of these charity’s as these people should know better and I also wonder how many charity’s actually told if the person didn’t turn up etc. Name and shame the bloody so called charity’s.

  5. 5 Know your rights at the jobcentre: you have the right to be accompanied to any interviews | Cautiously pessimistic said at 4:29 pm on August 7th, 2016:

    […] getting organised, we should all take a moment to celebrate the heroic work of Frank Zola and Boycott Workfare, who’ve finally triumphed after a four-and-a-half-year battle to get the DWP to comply with […]

  6. 6 Tales of unpaid toil: Sanctioned by the Samaritans | Benefit tales said at 1:06 pm on August 9th, 2016:

    […] the Samaritans don’t appear on the recently released lists of workfare exploiters from 2012, we’ve had a report of a Mandatory Work Activity placement in their shop in Hove in 2014. […]

  7. 7 The centre cannot hold: 2016 in review | Cautiously pessimistic said at 4:20 pm on January 1st, 2017:

    […] While the broader “anti-cuts movement” is looking pretty feeble these days, Sisters Uncut have been doing some good stuff, from occupying a flat in London and using it to set up a breakfast club to bringing about the resurrection of the Doncaster Women’s Aid centre after it was closed down by cuts. Boycott Workfare, who were involved in some of the most impressive and effective anti-austerity action in previous years, were relatively quiet this year, although they still sometimes chalk up local victories like stopping workfare at Colchester Debenhams, and the campaign against workfare also saw a notable, but very belated, court win over the DWP’s long-…. […]


Leave a Reply