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It’s working against workfare: Bulky Bob’s and LAMH pull out of Community Work Placements scheme

bulky bobs furniture store

Bulky Bobs and LAMH Recycling have both stepped back from workfare in the last few weeks!

It’s been a bad month for workfare: anti-workfare protests and campaigns in various parts of the country have been gaining ground at the expense of the DWP’s schemes. Campaigners are causing myriad problems for the Department for Work and Pensions: it is increasingly difficult for them find and keep placement providers for their Community Work Placements (CWP) scheme.

As Shiv Malik reported in the Guardian earlier this month, even the DWP admits that our actions are working. At the Information Commission tribunal hearing – where the DWP are challenging court orders telling them to release the list of organisations that are involved in workfare schemes – they argued, “that if the public knew exactly where people were being sent on placements political protests would increase, which was likely to lead to the collapse of several employment schemes”. Well, it would be a shame not to prove them right.

Successful attempts to get charities and other organisations to stop their involvement in workfare this month have taken many forms. There have been online actions; the work of the campaign urging charities to Keep Volunteering Voluntary (KVV); persistent one-man protests outside placement providers; and actions which didn’t even have to take place to get Bulky Bob’s to stop using workfare!

By some accounts, it was merely the threat of Liverpool IWW arriving at local household waste recycling firm Bulky Bob’s for the protest they had planned for the 12th of November that moved them to withdraw from workfare – although online actions by Liverpool IWW and others helped to pile pressure on the company’s management. Bulky Bob’s have also agreed to sign the KVV pledge, promising not to get involved in further unpaid work schemes. You can see their statement on their website here.

John MacArthur protested on his own for 2 hours a day outside the Motherwell (Scotland) charity ‘LAMH’ (Lanarkshire Association for Mental Health). He had been employed by the association at minimum wage in 2010-11, but recently was referred to them for unpaid work as part of the 6 month Community Work Placement programme. He was sanctioned in August – his Jobseeker’s Allowance was stopped until January for refusing to work for no wages at LAMH, leaving him “living on 16p tins of spaghetti”. But John made sure his former employers were aware of his situation and the negative publicity LAMH received induced them to drop out of the CWP scheme.

Sustained campaigning against workfare schemes has been destabilising the DWP’s schemes at every level this month, and clearly they’ve been feeling it. Let’s all support each other to keep up the good work going forward.

If you have any actions planned you’d like us to publicise, or any recent actions you’d like us to mention, get in touch at info@boycottworkfare.org.

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jj joop

Yipee!

Well done to Boycott Workfare and everyone else involved.

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It was reported that the "charity" LAMH pulled out of Workfare because of threats and vandalism.

That is not valid. The company received only a few telephone calls from some highly inarticulate people. As far as the so-called vandalism goes, some graffiti was scrawled on the wall of the LAMH premises.

The police were not called in to investigate.

LAMH pulled out because of the unfavourable publicity - like hundreds of other charities and companies all over the country.

No one in their right mind would defend "voluntary charitable work for the benefit of the community", if that work has become poisoned by making it MANDATORY!

Not only does the mandatory part of all this Workfare poison the spirit of true volunteering, it turns work into conscription, which, in a civilian workplace, is Forced or Compulsory Labour -itself a CRIMINAL offence!